Voting is a group technique were team-members can cast one or a limited number of votes on certain alternatives or ideas. A popular (online) form of visualizing voting is using polls.

The urgent/important matrix sorts goals, tasks, activities or ideas based on their importance and urgency.

Sticky dots is an alternative to voting in which you can stick dots to alternatives. The variant shown above is stoplight voting and includes positive and negative dots.

The RINGI Technique is method in which a document with solutions is passed along the table, comments are individually written and a final solution is selected based on the comments. Originally, this document was purposed to go through different hierarchical layers of a company, so that everyone involved could influence the decision.

Reverse brainstorming generates solutions to criticisms for alternatives. This is done by listing all criticisms and solving these criticisms with new alternatives.

The product criteria checklist helps to determine objectives based on predefined categories. Use this technique to determine a list of objectives for physical product development.

PMI lists Plus (positive attributes), Minus (negative attributes) and Interesting (interesting attributes) for a certain alternative and scores them.

Paired comparison is a technique which compares alternatives one to one in a tabular fashion. It is sometimes also used to compare criteria and calculate their weights. Alternatives are set-up over both table axes. When comparing one alternative with another, one can give a preference over one idea to another.

Negative Selection sorts alternatives into ‘No’ and ‘Maybe’ to reduce a large number of alternatives. Use negative selection to select the best set of ideas quickly.

The NAF/NUF test scores alternatives based on their novelty, attractiveness or usefulness, and feasibility.